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    13/11/2015

    Surrey garden maintenance November to do list

    It might be looking a bit grey and drab out there on some of these misty November mornings but don't be fooled, there's plenty to do in the garden this month when as well as tidying up behind the last season, we've got our eye on Spring. If you've not planted your Springtime bulbs it's not too late - think daffs, hyacinths and especially tulips - and if you've never planted bulbs before, don't panic because it's really very easy to get started and all you have to do is follow our simple guide (link to the bulbs planting).

    If you've always been jealous of the neighbour's magnificent magnolia tree now is the time to plant one of your own and whilst you're in the mood for planting, it's also time to get your Spring bedding plants, including pansies, violas and primulas, in the ground. Fans of roses in all their glory can start to plant bare root rose bushes now but if you run out of time (or cash for shopping in the garden centre) don't worry because you can plant these any time from now to the end of March. If you already have roses, make sure you gather the fallen leaves around each bush - this will help prevent the spread of any rust or blackspot that might have appeared earlier in the year.

    If you can get hold of fresh manure now is the time to fertilise the soil in your veg and flower gardens and if you are growing veg, you need to be lifting your parsnips after the first winter frost and dividing any clumps of rhubarb. If you have a spare half hour here and there, pop into the garden to clip off yellowing foliage from perennials that will now be past their best and rake up those autumn leaves which will you can use to help to enrich your winter compost pile.

    As part of your November tidy up, snip off decaying strawberry plant leaves and remove any runners and if you have an orchard, prune your pear and apple trees but not the plum trees which are prone to silver leaf fungus and so should not be pruned until midsummer.

    Finally, my last tip for forward thinking this month is to recommend you get outside with the secateurs and clip off some of the Holly branches that are laden right now with bright red berries ready for Christmas. Don't leave this job too much longer or the birds will beat you to the berries and there won't be any left to decorate the Christmas lunch table. You have been warned....

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